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About us


HISTORY OF PIERRE DU CALVET

Pierre du Calvet, born in Caussade France in 1735, disappeared at sea march 28 1786. During his lifetime, he was known as a trader, justice of peace, political prisoner and lampoonist. Pierre du Calvet immigrated to Canada in 1758. He participated the in last French victory battle on the coast of Lévis. After the conquest, he became a prosperous merchant and obtained the Sir Rivière David title where he also played the role of justice of the peace in Montreal.

His ideas are contained in two books where you can still find copies of at the Montreal Library and at the Old-Fort in the Island of Sainte-Hélène: : “Appel à la justice de l'État” (An appeal to justice of the State) and in English “The Case of Peter du Calvet Esq” both published in London in 1784.

In 2002, Jean-Pierre Boyer re-edited « Appel à la justice de l'État de Pierre du Calvet champion des droits démocratiques au Québec », as well as his biography and 22 unedited letters.


COAT OF ARMS & MAXIM

The crest is laden with eight sable Besants with a Knight on a gold background. This coat of arms is very ancient. It is the Trottier fellowship’s coat of arms. It is a reminder of this family’s courageous journey to settle in the French Colony, with barely 100 or so settlers.

Their maxim is in Latin and is a greeting; a reminder that we are at the service of our guests and that we cordially welcome you to our house as if it were your home.

"DOMUS MEA UT DOMUS TUA MDCCXXV"

"MY HOUSE IS YOUR HOUSE 1725"


HISTORY OF THE HOTEL

The Calvet house was built in 1725 inside the city's fortified walls, under the French regime. It is the oldest historical house that is open for public accommodations in Montreal.

Located at the corner of Bonsecours and Saint-Paul streets, it is massive and imposing with its stone walls and enormous chimney's.
 
 
Bonsecours Street is located in the heart of Old-Montreal at a walking distance of the Old-Port. It is one of the oldest in the city with its cobble stone street. The chapel Notre-Dame-de-Bonsecours and the Maison Pierre du Calvet are surrounded by historic homes that date from the XVIIIth and XIXth century.

HISTORY OF THE TROTTIER FAMILY AND OF THE OWNERS


In 1960, following the closing of the Bonsecours market and the gardeners abandoning the Jacques-Cartier Place, the Old-Montreal district was totally deserted and counted only about 200 or so dwellers. The city of Montreal had planned the demolition of the neighbourhood in order to construct a highway along the banks of the Saint-Laurence River. To oppose this decision and save the historic neighbourhood, a consciousness campaign was organised and pioneers undertook the renovation of strategic buildings in Old-Montreal.

In 1962, Jean-Jacques Trottier and Gertrude Beaupré Trottier decided to relocate their family and seven children to the old house Pierre du Calvet where they founded the restaurant Les Filles du Roy. They furnished it with family antiques, wicker chairs with counterpane cushions made of boys pants and family portraits adorning the walls.

The renaissance of Old-Montreal had begun.

Gaëtan Trottier and his associate Ronald Dravigné, later became the owners of the Calvet house, transforming it into a fine grocery store and café where they held cultural meetings called "Thursdays at Calvet". Over time they joined the contiguous house to the original Calvet house and created what is known today as The Pierre du Calvet Hostelries with its warm and magic familial atmosphere.

The vision that motivated the Trottier family and actual owners resides in the conservation and protection of this historical site.

Their mission today consists in sharing this jewel by offering an unforgettable stay in a warm and stylish atmosphere where clients can discover this history of the House and that of its inhabitants by indulging all their senses with emotion and passion.